SIGGRAPH 2020 talk for my technical paper: N-Dimensional Rigid Body Dynamics

It’s very exciting for work from a game (and a first for an indie game) to be presented in the SIGGRAPH Technical Papers program! Thank you all for your patience during development of the game, as you can see it can get pretty involved, ahah!

Link to the paper

6 Responses to “SIGGRAPH 2020 talk for my technical paper: N-Dimensional Rigid Body Dynamics”

  1. Sam says:

    This was awesome!

  2. sam says:

    Well I listened to an hour and half lecture on Geometric Algebra, and I think I have a basic grasp on what it does. It does really incredibly well at generalizing into multiple dimensions. I think I might be ready to tackle understanding physics calculation through that lens…

  3. mushi says:

    And another year is nearing its end, without Miegakure having been released.

    For what reason Mr. Bosch hasn’t already put it on Steam in Early Access years ago is difficult to fathom. Why why why???

    • marc says:

      I have been thinking about early access a bunch, and I don’t think it is very appropriate, because early access is only suited for very replayable games (like Hades, Factorio, …), or in the worse case very long games (like Baldur’s gate 3)… but I am open to being convinced otherwise!

      • mushi says:

        Thanks for the answer, Mr. Bosch.
        I see your point. Considering that a playable demo of the game was presented 7 years ago at PAX East 2014, I think pretty much everyone looking forward to it expected the game to be released before 2020.

        Now that I think about it, Miegakure might end up being the 2nd or even 1st place game in the ranking for “Most protracted game development”.

        https://www.thegamer.com/games-with-long-development-time/

        And become the new Guinnes World Record title holder for the cathegory.

        https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/most-protracted-game-development/

        Which might be good for promoting the game at launch. Seriously.

        • marc says:

          Honestly I think there are so many differences that any comparison is not relevant. Much smaller team, more scientific research, releasing 4D Toys… and how about all these games that are still being worked on years after being released? I would argue they count as very long dev time as well.

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